Category Archive for: Mac Rumors

Siri Bug Allows Cellular Data to be Disabled From Lock Screen Without a Passcode

A reddit user has discovered what appears to be a Siri-related bug that allows access to a locked iPhone’s Cellular Data options without a passcode.

As shown in the screenshot below, when Siri is asked to bring up Cellular Data settings (or if Cellu…

macOS 10.13 Wishlist: Features MacRumors Readers Hope to See in the Next Version of macOS

Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference is set to kick off on June 5, and along with a new version of iOS, Apple is expected to introduce the next-generation version of macOS, macOS 10.13. We’ve heard no rumors on what to expect in macOS 10.13, so what…

Apple Developing ‘Apple Neural Engine’ Chip to Power AI in iOS Devices

Apple is developing a dedicated processor that will be used to handle AI-related tasks like facial and speech recognition in its products, reports Bloomberg. Citing a source with knowledge of Apple’s plans, the site says the chip is known internally as…

Review: Apple’s Beddit Sleep Monitor Offers a Comprehensive Look at Sleep Quality

Earlier this month, Apple purchased its first company that develops health-related hardware, Beddit. Beddit makes an iPhone-connected Sleep Monitor that tracks a wide range of sleep-related metrics, from heart rate and sleep time to room temperature and respiration.

When Apple acquires a company, the company in question typically shuts down and stops selling whatever product it makes as Apple assimilates the technology into its own offerings, but that’s not the case with Beddit. Apple is still selling the Beddit Sleep Monitor in its stores, and the Beddit privacy policy has been updated to note that Apple is collecting Beddit sleep data.


That raises some interesting questions about Apple’s future plans. Will that sleep tracking data contribute to an upcoming Apple Watch with sleep tracking functionality? Does Apple have plans for some other kind of sleep tracking device? Will Beddit be one of several health-related companies Apple purchases so it can sell a range of hardware products?

Apple’s plans for the Beddit technology may be a mystery right now, but we can take a closer look at the Sleep Monitor to see just what it can do, what kind of data Apple is gathering, and whether it’s worth buying. I bought a Beddit Sleep Monitor shortly after Apple announced its acquisition, and I’ve been testing it for the past 10 days.

The Beddit Sleep Monitor belongs to a class of sleep tracking devices that aren’t wearable. It’s meant to be placed directly on the bed under the sheets rather than on the body. Design wise, it consists of a long strip of fabric that’s about 2.5 feet in length and three inches wide. One side is a soft, pliable material, while the other side, which sits on the mattress, is backed with rubber so it stays in place. It’s small enough that it’s easy to pack up when traveling.



The Sleep Monitor is meant to be placed underneath the bottom sheet of a bed, on top of the mattress near where the heart is located when you lie down. It can be placed on one side of the bed in a shared bed, or in the middle for a person who sleeps alone. While it can be used in a shared bed, Beddit is meant for one person, and because the sensor is directly underneath the body, it accurately picks up the movement of a single person even when two people are in the bed.

In my testing, the Sleep Monitor never picked up movement or measurements that weren’t mine, and it never failed to monitor me. I installed it on my side of a full-sized bed, right at the level where my heart is. Beddit says the Sleep Monitor is unnoticeable during sleep, and while it is indeed made from a thin, flexible fabric, I can feel it under my sheet. It isn’t exactly bothersome and doesn’t prevent me from sleeping, but I know it’s there.


It’s not supposed to move because of the rubber backing, but it does shift around. I don’t move much in my sleep so the movement wasn’t an issue for me, but someone who tosses and turns might need to make regular adjustments to its position. It’s also worth noting that the Beddit has a thin, unobtrusive cord that needs to be plugged in at all times, so it will need to be near an outlet.


So what does the Beddit track? As it turns out, a lot. It goes beyond wearable sleep trackers that rely solely on movement to determine sleep quality, and some of what it tracks is potentially very valuable for people with breathing-related sleep issues. Here’s everything it keeps tabs on:

  • Sleep time
  • The time it took to fall asleep
  • Light sleep vs. deep sleep (no REM measurement)
  • Number of times out of bed
  • Restless sleep (lots of tossing and turning)
  • Sleep efficiency (based on time spent asleep)
  • Sleep score (an overall score that takes everything into account)
  • Snoring (via iPhone speaker)
  • Heart rate
  • Respiration (breaths per minute)
  • Average room temperature
  • Average room humidity

With so many aspects of the sleeping experience being tracked, the Beddit Sleep Monitor gives a comprehensive overview of everything that happens while you’re asleep. Having a complete overview makes it easier to recognize patterns and problems that are interfering with sleep, especially when it’s easy to see right in the accompanying Beddit app.

So is it accurate? For the most part, yes. My heart rate measurements were in line with what I see with my Apple Watch, and the respiration measurement and temperature were spot on too. Sleep time, sleep efficiency, and the time it took to fall asleep were areas where felt like I had less of a clear picture, though.

Beddit provides an overall sleep score each night

I’m a light sleeper and it often takes me a long time to fall asleep, but at the same time, I don’t move a lot. Beddit could not tell the difference between when I was awake lying in bed and when I was actually asleep, whether it was when I was falling asleep for the first time or when I woke up in the middle of the night.

That’s led to some overestimation of the amount of time I’m asleep, which in turn impacts the sleep efficiency score. It’s not wildly inaccurate every day, but it’s been off by as much as a half hour. Someone who lies awake (and still) in bed for long swaths of time may be disappointed with the accuracy of the Beddit. A more restless sleeper won’t have this problem because the Sleep Monitor will pick up the movement.

The time to fall asleep and awake measurements here are off

Though the sleep efficiency/time measurement is not entirely accurate for me, the sleep graph in the app gives me a much clearer picture of how my night went. It measures light sleep and deep sleep, and while the app tells me I was asleep when it dips down sharply, that’s actually when I was awake. The Beddit Sleep Monitor seems to be accurately interpreting my sleep/wake patterns, but then misreading some of the data when calculating sleep efficiency and sleep score.

When I want a general idea of how I slept in a given night, I check the graph before relying on the sleep time and sleep efficiency numbers. The graph, though, is only divided by hour and so the information I have is limited – this would be a lot more useful if I could drill down into more specific timeframes. As an example, it’ll tell me I got out of bed sometime near 3:00 a.m., but it won’t give me the exact time.

Beddit says I slept roughly the same amount of time on these two nights, but the graph tells a different story. At each dip, I was awake, not in a state of light sleep.

Along with the light/deep sleep graph, the Beddit app offers up concrete numbers on all of the different tracking metrics, plus a graph for heart rate. Comparing the sleep graph and the heart rate graph has proven to be interesting because of the correlation between the two. There are often small jumps in my heart rate at the times when Beddit says I’m most deeply asleep, which seems to relate to dreams/nightmares.

A sleep graph compared to a heart rate graph from the same night

The Beddit app measures two factors I wasn’t able to properly test — snoring and restless sleep. I don’t seem to move enough to trigger any restless sleep readings, and I don’t snore. My partner snores, though, so I can say that it’s sensitive enough to tell my breathing from his. By the way, the Beddit has been able to track my sleeping accurately regardless of position. I’m a side or stomach sleeper, but also tested sleeping on my back. There’s no difference in the data.

Beddit data is displayed on a day-by-day basis, but there are also options to see trends over 7, 30, and 90 days. Trends cover sleep score, sleep time, heart rate, bedroom temperature/humidity, and a notes feature, which is actually one of the handiest ways to measure sleep trends.


Each morning, you can rate how you feel after a night’s sleep and add notes and tags to keep track of factors that might have impacted sleep. My cat meows some mornings, so I might add a note that I was woken up by the cat. If I ate something unusual or drank caffeine late in the day, those are also things that could be noted, and over time, I might be able to notice trends. Tags are important because the app will automatically correlate tags with sleep efficiency scores.

My sleep is worse on nights tagged “cat,” which means my cat was meowing in the early morning.

There’s a built-in smart alarm feature in the Beddit app, designed to go off up to 30 minutes before the set time whenever sleep is lightest. The idea is that if you’re woken up in a light sleep, you’ll be less groggy. It worked semi-well, but 30 minutes is a long window and there’s no customization option to shorten it.


One other thing worth noting — Beddit can be set to automatically start tracking sleep as soon as you get in the bed at night, so there’s no need to open the app and turn it on. I liked the convenience of this feature, but ended up leaving manual activation on because I like to read in bed before sleeping and the Beddit thought I was asleep when I was reading.

Overall, the Beddit app is well done and it offers up a lot of info, but there are some negatives. First of all, the Beddit Sleep Monitor needs to be continually connected to the iPhone via Bluetooth when it’s in use at night, which Beddit says is necessary because of the amount of data being transferred. With a continual Bluetooth connection, the Beddit is a serious battery drain (it’ll suck up a good 30 to 40% on an iPhone 7 Plus). You’re going to want to plug your iPhone in at night when using it.

Second, snoring tracking is done on the iPhone, and there’s no way to disable it. That means Beddit is using the microphone, which happens to disable my AirPods and other Bluetooth headphones. It also prevents “Hey Siri” hands-free commands from working. There is no option to disable snoring tracking, which is a downside for people who don’t snore.

Third, given the amount of information the Sleep Monitor tracks, I think the app could offer up more detail, like a clearer picture of specific heart rate and respiration rates over time. Luckily, it connects to Apple Health, and all of this data is synced there.

In the Health app, you can see each respiration and heart rate measurement during the night, and the Beddit also syncs overall sleep data.

Heart rate measurement in Health app on left, respiration on right

One last thing — the Beddit is compatible with nap taking. It tracks nap length just like a standard night of sleep and adds that information to the day’s overall sleep score and sleep time.

Bottom Line

In 10 days, the Beddit Sleep Monitor hasn’t taught me anything I didn’t already know, but as someone who likes to track things and collect data, I find the information it’s giving me valuable, even if some of its conclusions about my sleep aren’t 100 percent accurate. I suspect that with longer use and more attention to tags, I might be able to learn more.

I’ve had sleep problems my entire life, so I’ve already learned to stick to a rigorous sleep routine, but someone who needs help establishing good sleep habits or figuring out what’s impacting sleep could potentially benefit from the Beddit Sleep Monitor.

With its snoring, heart rate, and respiration features, Beddit will be able to pick up on sleep apnea and breathing issues, and the data combined with user notes can help suss out other sleep problems.

$150 is expensive, but if it’s able to provide a better night’s sleep for someone who’s struggling, the high price tag is worth it. People without serious sleep issues who just like to keep track of health metrics will also likely be satisfied with the Beddit given the many things it tracks.

In its current incarnation, the Beddit Sleep Monitor is a decent sleep tracker. With Apple’s tweaking, I think it could be a lot better. In my experience, it’s collecting all the data it needs, but with some fine tuning, that data could be better interpreted and more valuable.

I’ve never used a sleep tracker that can tell the difference between when I’m lying in bed and when I’m asleep, but if anyone can solve that problem and refine sleep tracking algorithms, it’ll probably be Apple. I’m interested to see what kind of improvements Apple can make to sleep tracking and what it plans to do with the data and the technology it has acquired from Beddit, so I’ll keep using my Sleep Monitor.

How to Buy

The Beddit 3 Sleep Monitor can be purchased from Apple for $149.95.

Tag: Beddit

Discuss this article in our forums

TouchArcade iOS Gaming Roundup: Steredenn, Fidget Spinner Apps, Prison Architect, and More

In case you missed the post last week, once again this is Eli Hodapp, and I’m Editor in Chief of MacRumors‘ iOS gaming sister site TouchArcade. We’re putting together these weekly roundups of the biggest news and releases in the world of iOS gaming. If you’re interested in this quick recap, there’s tons more where this came from over on TouchArcade. We post daily news, reviews, and more, covering every aspect of the world of iOS gaming.


We’ve also got a very active iOS gaming Twitch channel, a Discord server, our own forums, and a weekly podcast. All of these things are packed with other iOS gamers and developers, discussing iOS gaming around the clock! Anyway, here are the big things you don’t want to miss this week:

We kicked off Monday morning with a five star review of Steredenn. It’s an incredible horizontal space shooter that aside from just being a really fun game does a lot of incredibly innovative things when it comes to how weapon upgrades are handled, as well as how you move your ship. For instance, these games often use a relative-touch based control scheme, and that’s true here, but when the game detects your ship is obscured by your finger both a horizontal and vertical line appear on screen indicating where you are. It sounds basic, and I suppose it is, but the difference these little things make is amazing.

While I’m a little surprised that the collective internet eye-roll surrounding the Angry Birds movie didn’t cause some sort of seismic event when it was first announced, the film did incredibly well, grossing just under $350 million. (It’s actually far better than you’d expect, if you haven’t seen it.) So, it should be a surprise to absolutely no one that a sequel is on the way.

Due out on September 20th, 2019, The Angry Birds Movie 2 already has some interesting names signed on. It’ll be directed by Thurop Van Orman and John Rice (with the latter serving as co-director), who have worked on Adventure Time and Rick and Morty. No further details surrounding the plot or direction of the film have been made public, although there’s plenty of time for all sorts of tidbits to dribble out before late 2019.

We’ve spent a lot of time discussing the troubling trend of what a bad platform iOS when it comes to preserving gaming history, as iOS system updates (and other things) often render classic iOS titles totally broken. With iOS 11 likely dropping support for 32-bit apps and games, we’re on the verge of seeing the largest purge of older iOS games yet. While Apple’s response is to simply update those games to 64-bit binaries, we explore in an editorial, “just updating” is often not as simple as it sounds – particularly if the creator of a game you love is deceased.

Lightening things up a bit, we’ve been scratching our heads trying to figure out the unbelievable popularity of fidget spinner apps. It seems the whole draw of a fidget spinner is it’s a physical toy that exists, which you actively fidget with. You’d think virtualizing this would remove most of the appeal, but judging by the iTunes charts, that isn’t the case at all. After talking to various educators, we offer an alternative theory. Perhaps fidget spinner apps are becoming the next big thing because fidget spinners themselves are rapidly getting banned from classrooms, while smartphones, inexplicably, are totally allowed? Either way, if you’re interested in trying the most popular one, download Ketchapp’s Fidget Spinner.

Limbic released the original Zombie Gunship on the App Store ages ago, and the unbelievable success of a game where you shoot down swarms of zombies aboard an AC-130 put the studio on the map. Another Zombie Gunship game has been in development forever, in soft launch for even longer, and finally launched worldwide this week. While it shares a lot with its predecessor, Zombie Gunship Survival has much more meat on its bones with loads of things to unlock and other upgrades to work towards. The original Zombie Gunship was a ton of fun, so more of that, plus loads of improvements makes Survival even better.

The rivalry between the FIFA and Pro Evolution Soccer series on mobile has been heating up for years now, but with FIFA taking an odd turn to becoming more of a card collecting game, this week’s release of Pro Evolution Soccer 2017 is perfect for soccer fans looking for more action. Early impressions of the game indicate that it finally feels like iOS has the soccer simulator that it deserves with a full-featured soccer experience that is just absolutely loaded with depth. Controls are swipe based, which people seem to either love or hate, but it’s totally free to try out so if you’re at all interested in soccer, this is the game to get.

After a lengthy soft launch period, the cult-classic fighting game Skullgirls is finally available. Like many other mobile fighters, it is controlled using swipe gestures which has proven to work incredibly well for the genre. The mechanics of the game are super tight, and once you get used to the swiping system, you likely won’t find yourself missing a controller at all. Like many free to play fighters, Skullgirls is powered by a freemium random draw gacha system to unlock new characters, which again, has become totally normal for the genre (for better or for worse).

Prison Architect has been incredibly popular on Steam, and this week the mobile port hit the App Store. It’s iPad only, like many PC to mobile ports, and puts players in charge of designing and managing their own prisons. Featuring surprising levels of complexity, Prison Architect has an array of scenarios to complete which really serve as a tutorial of sorts for the full-featured sandbox mode. One strange thing is how you pay for the game: It’s free to download and try, then you can buy individual scenarios for $2.99 a piece, the sandbox mode for $4.99, or unlock everything for $14.99. It feels like they give too much away for free, but for the curious consumer I suppose that’s a good thing.


In the past, Capcom has released Street Fighter games on mobile, with the first one hitting the App Store all the way back in 2010. Aside from compatibility updates here and there, the games have largely sat dormant and over the years have only felt increasingly more outdated. This week, in true Capcom fashion, the iterative sequel Street Fighter IV Championship Edition was announced. Aside from 25 playable characters, Championship Edition will have full MFi controller support, WiFi multiplayer, and loads of other updates and refinements over the original Street Fighter mobile games. Championship Edition will be released “this summer,” and you can pre-register for the game here to get notified when it does.

Last, but not least, with the holiday weekend upon us, an absurd amount of iOS games are on sale. The whole Infinity Blade series can be had for a buck a piece, along with many, many other classic, premium iOS games. Head over to our listing to see everything worth considering downloading, along with reviews of the vast majority of games that are on sale.

That’s it for this week! For even more iOS gaming news, head over to TouchArcade – otherwise stay tuned for next week’s roundup!

Discuss this article in our forums

MacRumors Giveaway: Win a Copy of ‘Total War: WARHAMMER’ From Feral Interactive

For this week’s giveaway, we’ve teamed up with Feral Interactive to give MacRumors readers a chance to win a copy of real-time strategy game Total War: WARHAMMER, which became available for the Mac in April.

Total War: WARHAMMER is a turn-based strategy game that allows players to build an empire and then plan and execute real-time tactical battles against enemies. Unlike other Warhammer games, Total War: WARHAMMER takes place in a high fantasy setting, pitting greenskins (orcs and goblins), vampires, dwarves, and humans against one another.


There are four playable factions that players can control, each with unique gameplay elements, play styles, abilities, and units to send into battle. The goal is to build up a city, recruit units, make alliances with other nations, and fight to protect and expand your hold over the Old World.


Aerial units like wyverns and dragons, specially trained Legendary Lords, and other powerful elements like magic must be thoughtfully wielded to turn the tide in battle. Because there are multiple factions and game paths to take, Total War: WARHAMMER is endlessly replayable.

Mac vs. Mac online multiplayer is available and supports up to eight players. There’s also a co-op mode that allows players to play through the campaign with or against a friend.


Feral Interactive, for those unfamiliar with the company, is a video game publisher that works with various companies to bring popular PC games to the Mac. Feral has brought a wide range of titles to the Mac, like the LEGO series, Rome: Total War, Tomb Raider, XCOM, and several Warhammer titles.

Total War: WARHAMMER is available from Steam, the Feral Interactive website, or the Mac App Store for $49.99-$59.99, but we have 10 Steam copies to give away to MacRumors readers.

To enter to win, use the Rafflecopter widget below and enter an email address. Email addresses will be used solely for contact purposes to reach the winner and send the prize. You can earn additional entries by subscribing to our weekly newsletter, subscribing to our YouTube channel, following us on Twitter, or visiting the MacRumors Facebook page.

Due to the complexities of international laws regarding giveaways, only U.S. residents who are 18 years of age or older are eligible to enter. To offer feedback or get more information on the giveaway restrictions, please refer to our Site Feedback section, as that is where discussion of the rules will be redirected.

a Rafflecopter giveawayThe contest will run from today (May 26) at 11:00 a.m. Pacific Time through 11:00 a.m. Pacific Time on June 2. The winners will be chosen randomly on June 2 and will be contacted by email. The winners will have 48 hours to respond and provide a shipping address before new winners are chosen.

Tags: giveaway, Feral

Discuss this article in our forums

Best Buy Memorial Day Sale Savings on Apple Watch, Mac Notebooks, 9.7-Inch iPad Pro, and More

Best Buy today launched a four-day-long Memorial Day sale that has markdowns on quite a few Apple products, including Apple Watch, iPhone 7, iPhone SE, iPad, MacBook Air, MacBook Pro, and iMac. The four day sale begins today and ends on Memorial Day, this Monday, May 29.

Note: MacRumors is an affiliate partner with Best Buy and may earn commissions on purchases made through these links.

The first item up for sale is Apple Watch Series 2, which Best Buy has marked down $70 for nearly all models of Apple’s wearable device. Each purchase of an Apple Watch during the event will net customers free in-store setup and advice by Geek Squad.


Aluminum case models including Nike are priced at $299 for 38mm or $329 for 42mm, while stainless steel models range from $479 to $679 depending on casing color and band combinations.

Best Buy’s iPhone 7 sale lets customers save up to $300 when they buy and activate an iPhone 7 or iPhone 7 Plus on a monthly installment plan, with carrier plan options varying by store. Similarly, Best Buy is offering up to $200 off the iPhone SE 16GB and 64GB models with the purchase of a monthly installment plan.


For Mac notebooks, Best Buy is providing discounts of between $200 and $250 on MacBook Air and MacBook Pro models. The new MacBook Pro with Touch Bar isn’t included in the site’s Memorial Day sale. Customers who buy one of the MacBooks will also get six months of Trend Micro Internet Security for free, which will cover up to three iOS, Mac, Android, or Windows devices for the time frame.

Best Buy has marked down numerous versions of Apple’s 9.7-inch iPad Pro, with savings between $100 and $125 off of the devices in Wi-Fi only configurations. Discounts of $100 are also available on iPad mini 4 Wi-Fi models. With the purchase of an iPad customers will receive a free six months of Kaspersky Internet Security that covers a range of three devices across iOS, Mac, Android, and Windows.

Best Buy has a few deals on iMacs, Mac minis, and Mac Pros this weekend, with savings going up to $200 on iMac and $100 on Mac mini, with the same free warranty offer as it’s offering for customers purchasing a MacBook. Best Buy is also knocking $600 off of the original price of the quad-core Mac Pro that has discontinued been by Apple.

Finally, the Memorial Day sale also includes a few smart home items, like connected light bulbs and the Nanoleaf Aurora lighting system. Beats by Dre Powerbeats3 Wireless headphones are on sale for $129.99 ($70 in savings), as well as the DJI Phantom 4 Quadcopter drone at $999.99 ($200 in savings). Customers can choose between free in-store pick up on all items, or get free two-day shipping for any orders over $35.

Visit Best Buy’s Hot Deals page here to see the full list of products available before the Memorial Day sale ends on Monday.

Related Roundup: Apple Deals
Tag: Best Buy

Discuss this article in our forums

This Week’s Cover of ‘The New Yorker’ Was Sketched on an iPad

This week’s cover of The New Yorker has been sketched using an iPad and Apple Pencil, created by illustrator Jorge Colombo. The image depicts Brooklyn Bridge Park in Brooklyn Heights that Colombo frequents, with the artwork capturing a couple of basketball games and spectators at the park.

Apple CEO Tim Cook shared The New Yorker cover on Twitter this morning, with a quote from Colombo who mentioned his fear that one of the basketballs would fly near him and hit his iPad.

It’s one of my favorite places to hang out,” Jorge Colombo says, about the park he sketched, on an iPad, for the cover of this week’s issue. “I live down the street, in Brooklyn Heights, so I go there all the time, either to take the East River Ferry or just to relax by the water.

It is a magnet—people come from all of Brooklyn’s many neighborhoods just to take a selfie by the waterfront or picnic by the water. This was a risky drawing to make, though: I kept worrying that the ball would hit me or the iPad.”

The New Yorker also shared a video of Colombo’s illustration process on its website this week. Apple’s iPad and Apple Pencil have been celebrated as tools for artists in the past, with Apple recently highlighting Rob Zilla’s NBA illustrations. Apple’s tablet was even used to create the poster for Stranger Things on Netflix.

Discuss this article in our forums

TSMC Sources Claim ‘iPhone 8’ Will Have Touch ID Integrated into Display

Apple has successfully finalized a solution to integrate Touch ID fingerprint recognition directly into the display of its upcoming “iPhone 8”, according to a new report on Friday.

Chinese-language Economic Daily News (EDN) said it spoke to sources …

Bear 1.2 Brings Sketching, New Icons, and VoiceOver to Note-Taking App

Popular note-taking app Bear received an update on Thursday across Mac and iOS that adds a number of notable features to the Evernote rival.

The biggest change to Bear is the ability to sketch on iOS. Users can now add sketches to their notes using a finger or stylus. Sketches are drawn on a separate open canvas, which includes pencil and marker tools similar to Apple Notes, with each pencil coming in three sizes and a range of colors.


Next, Bear has taken cues from the new API in iOS 10.3 that enables apps to use custom icons. Bear supports eight different themes, and now each one has an accompanying icon so that Bear’s appearance on the Home screen optionally matches the selected theme.

Bear 1.2 also brings VoiceOver support, to aid blind and visually impaired notetakers. Elsewhere, a Bear Notes sticker pack has been included for use in iMessages.

Lastly, Bear has been translated for three new languages: Korean, Russian, and Brazilian Portugese. Bear 1.2 is free and offers a $1.49 monthly or $14.99 annual subscription model for Pro features. Bear is available to download on the App Store for iPad and iPhone [Direct Link], as well as on the Mac App Store [Direct Link].
Discuss this article in our forums

Feral Updates ‘Sid Meier’s Railroads!’ for macOS Compatibility

Feral has announced that Sid Meier’s Railroads!, the classic “tycoon” strategy game released on PC in 2006, has been updated on Mac to include full compatibility with Apple’s latest macOS platform.

If you missed Sid Meier’s Railroads! last time around, the game is a re-imagining of the best-selling Railroad Tycoon, which was released in 1990 for Amiga, Atari ST, and MS DOS. The game has been in dire need of a compatibility and stability update for several years, so today’s announcement should come as good news for die-hard fans.


Like the original, players are tasked with constructing a rail empire across one of four locations: the Western United States, the Northeastern United States, Great Britain, or continental Europe.

Lay track, route trains and watch the world come to life in this compelling mix of train set and business simulator. Become the ultimate railroad robber baron with the drive to shape a nation, build an empire and amass a fortune.

Spanning the history of the railroads from the steam engines of the 1830s to the bullet trains of today, Sid Meier’s Railroads!, out now on Mac, is a bold re-imagining of the legendary Railroad Tycoon (1990) that launched the “tycoon” genre.

Players get to control 40 historically accurate trains across seven historical scenarios and over 150 years of American and European history. Features at the disposal of budding tycoons include corporate warfare, demand and supply, stock trading, patent bidding, and industry building. A LAN multiplayer mode also lets players sabotage their rivals and monopolize the industry.

Minimum requirements for the game are as follows: MacOS 10.12.4 or later, Intel 1.8GHz processor, 4GB RAM, 2GB disk space, and 256MB graphics memory. The following graphics cards are not supported: ATI HD2xxx series, ATI X1xxx series, Intel GMA series, Intel HD3000, Nvidia 9xxx series, Nvidia 7xxx series, Nvidia 1xx series, and Nvidia 8xxx series. The game is not currently supported on volumes formatted as case-sensitive.

Sid Meier’s Railroads! is currently on offer at the special price of $2.49 on the Steam store until May 29. The game is also available on the Mac App Store ($17.99) and direct from Feral’s online store ($9.99). Existing owners of the game should see an update in the Mac App Store.

Tag: Feral

Discuss this article in our forums

iPhone 8 Case Compared to iPhone 7 Offers Clear Picture of Size Difference

Though the launch of the “iPhone 8” is months away, case makers have already started creating cases for the device based on leaked design renderings and schematics.

A case designed for the iPhone 8 surfaced on Alibaba, and was purchased by Japanese …

iOS 11 Wishlist: Features MacRumors Readers Are Hoping to See in the Next Version of iOS

Apple will introduce the next-generation version of iOS, iOS 11, on June 5 at its Worldwide Developers Conference. While WWDC is less than two weeks away, we’ve haven’t heard many details on what we can expect.

There’s talk about an overhauled desig…

Apple Confirms June 5 WWDC Keynote Will Be Live Streamed

Apple today added a new events page to its main website, confirming that its June 5 Worldwide Developers Conference will be live streamed and available to watch on the Apple website and through the Apple TV.

Apple previously said it would provide a …

Apple Releases New Earth Day Video at Sustainable Brands Event

Apple today shared a new Earth Day 2017 video on its YouTube channel, which comes more than a month after Earth Day took place.

The video, which follows the theme of the previous Earth Day spots Apple released, focuses on Liam, Apple’s recycling rob…

Magikarp Jump Launches as Latest Pokémon Game for iPhone and iPad

The Pokémon Company has launched a new iPhone and iPad game revolving around one of the weakest Pokémon ever: Magikarp.


Magikarp Jump, available now on the App Store [Direct Link], tasks players with raising multiple generations of Magikarp by feeding and training them to increase their Jump Power and overall level. Players can then battle—try to jump higher than—other Magikarp in six leagues to increase their personal Trainer Rank.

As a player’s Trainer Rank increases, additional food and training upgrades can be purchased from the Town with coins, which are awarded for various in-game tasks such as winning league battles. A higher Trainer Rank also allows players to fish for additional Magikarp with different designs.

Magikarp Jump is entirely free to play, but diamonds are available as optional in-app purchases for players who wish to buy pond decorations and other items that help Magikarps grow and train even faster.

Magikarp Jump is not nearly as sophisticated as Pokémon GO, but with a number of achievements to complete, it’s a decent way to pass the time on a train ride home or a lazy Sunday afternoon. You’ll also see other classic Pokémon such as Pikachu and Pidgeotto appear at times for a bit of nostalgia.


Magikarp Jump is a free download on the App Store [Direct Link] for iPhone and iPad.

Tag: Pokemon

Discuss this article in our forums

Microsoft Announces ‘Mixer Create’ iOS App for On-The-Go Live Streaming of iPhone Games

Microsoft today announced a rebranding of its game streaming service “Beam,” which will now be called “Mixer,” along with the launch of a new iOS and Android app that will debut today in beta form. Called “Mixer Create,” the app will include a handful of self-broadcasting features that let streamers keep in contact with their audience while on the go.

Additionally, down the line Microsoft will update Mixer Create to let creators stream live gameplay of iOS games directly from their iPhones and iPads, similar to how Mixer can stream games on PC and Xbox One. The mobile broadcasts will be viewable by users on any platform that Mixer is on, including the basic Mixer app for iOS [Direct Link] and Android, as well as on Xbox One and the web.


Although it hasn’t yet explained the specifics of how the feature will work, Microsoft gave examples of streamers sharing live gameplay from their iPhone, including streaming their hunt for Pokémon in Pokémon Go.

Mixer Create Beta Launches on Mobile Devices (iOS and Android) — Mixer Create is a new mobile app that enables self-broadcasting, and we’re kicking off the beta today. Soon thereafter, we’ll add the ability to stream live gameplay from your mobile device as well. The ability to broadcast gameplay on-the-go opens up entirely new social gaming possibilities.

In the future, you could imagine streaming “Pokémon Go” on your mobile device, through Mixer, and hunting with viewers! Once mobile gameplay streaming launches, you’ll be able to join a co-stream with friends who are broadcasting on PC, console or other mobile devices.

The rebranding announcement today includes multiple other feature reveals, mostly related to the service’s website and Xbox One app. Those who stream on Mixer will now be able to co-stream with up to three other people, meaning up to four creators can combine their streams into one experience for viewers to watch. The company said the feature is aimed at co-op games where four players are playing at the same time, but it also supports each streamer playing totally different games as well.

Beam originally launched in January 2016 before Microsoft acquired it in August 2016 for an undisclosed sum, and then integrated the game streaming service into Windows 10 and Xbox One earlier in 2017. In a launch video explaining the name change and detailing the new features, Mixer’s director of marketing Jenn McCoy and co-founder James Boehm said that the new name was chosen “because it represents what we love most about the platform, that it’s all about bringing people together.”

Mixer Create should begin rolling out on the iOS App Store throughout the day, and the iOS game streaming features will be “coming soon.”

Tag: Microsoft

Discuss this article in our forums

New Images Provide Detailed Glimpse Into Apple Orchard Road in Singapore

After removing the barricades from its brand new retail location in Singapore, Apple this week has allowed a few reporters to tour the inside of Apple Orchard Road ahead of its grand opening this Saturday, May 27 (via Mashable). The location marks Apple’s first store in Southeast Asia.


The outside of the store features an all-glass design that spans 120 feet, allowing anyone passing by to glimpse into the two-story location. The bottom level of the store houses the traditional retail aspect of Apple locations, letting customers browse and purchase products like iPhone, Apple Watch, and MacBook.


A curved staircase inspired by Apple Park leads up to the second story where customers will find a large grove of trees that was specially brought in from Malaysia, and that Apple hopes gives off a “modern-day town square” vibe. Next to the trees sit a collection of cubes and a large screen — an area specifically designed for “Today at Apple” events.


In one moment during the media’s tour through Apple Orchard Road, an illustrator was seen drawing on iPad with Apple Pencil, and the store was displaying her progress on the screen. Like all Today at Apple events, the company wants customers to be able to walk into Apple at any time of the day and find inspiration.

“You can see an illustrator just sitting over there and we’re air-playing her illustration on the video wall — that’s the real goal at Apple. You can come come in and be inspired or buy an iPhone, but we wanna show people what they can create with our products.”

“You can see an illustrator just sitting over there and we’re air-playing her illustration on the video wall — that’s the real goal at Apple. You can come come in and be inspired or buy an iPhone, but we wanna show people what they can create with our products.”

Apple Orchard Road represents one of nine major next-generation Apple Store redesigns, which also includes its spots at Union Square in New York, Dubai, Ginza, and more. The major changes began last summer when Apple dropped “Store” from its retail branding, signifying its shift to a communal gathering place over a purely merchandise purchasing experience.

After a year and a half, Apple Orchard Road will finally open to the public on May 27 at 10:00 a.m. local time. Check out more photos of the store taken by Mashable and CNET, including the location’s boardroom that has murals of Apple Park hanging on the walls and Designed by Apple in California sitting on a few tables.

Discuss this article in our forums

New York Mag’s Lauren Kern Named First Editor-in-Chief of Apple News

Lauren Kern, Executive Editor at New York Magazine, has been named as the first editor-in-chief of Apple News, according to Politico.

It’s unclear what exactly the role will entail, but it suggests Apple has bigger ambitions of some kind for its N…

Back to Top
Book an Appointment

Book an Appointment with WMTDS - Click Here