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IDG Contributor Network: News from Epicor’s annual user conference

Epicor’s annual user conference in Nashville this year was a good chance to spend time with the company, its partners and its customers. I have some big thoughts about Epicor and its existential issues, but I’ll leave that post for a little later. For now, here’s a roundup of what we saw at the show.

Show demographics

Thirty-two countries were represented at the show, with some 3,300 attendees. There was a good mix of customers, media/analysts, partners (although more on that in a later post) and, of course, Epicor’s employees. The event venue, the Gaylord Opry, was a little strange and, in my mind at least, was a bit of a reflection of the company, its customers and its struggles. But again, more on that later.

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Sergey Brin’s secret airship will deliver aid and schlep his family

Last month, news dropped that Google co-founder Sergey Brin is building an airship on the sly — not a traditional airplane but an honest-to-god helium-filled dirigible. While he insisted the project wasn’t operating under the tech titan, which had p…

Review: Apple’s Beddit Sleep Monitor Offers a Comprehensive Look at Sleep Quality

Earlier this month, Apple purchased its first company that develops health-related hardware, Beddit. Beddit makes an iPhone-connected Sleep Monitor that tracks a wide range of sleep-related metrics, from heart rate and sleep time to room temperature and respiration.

When Apple acquires a company, the company in question typically shuts down and stops selling whatever product it makes as Apple assimilates the technology into its own offerings, but that’s not the case with Beddit. Apple is still selling the Beddit Sleep Monitor in its stores, and the Beddit privacy policy has been updated to note that Apple is collecting Beddit sleep data.


That raises some interesting questions about Apple’s future plans. Will that sleep tracking data contribute to an upcoming Apple Watch with sleep tracking functionality? Does Apple have plans for some other kind of sleep tracking device? Will Beddit be one of several health-related companies Apple purchases so it can sell a range of hardware products?

Apple’s plans for the Beddit technology may be a mystery right now, but we can take a closer look at the Sleep Monitor to see just what it can do, what kind of data Apple is gathering, and whether it’s worth buying. I bought a Beddit Sleep Monitor shortly after Apple announced its acquisition, and I’ve been testing it for the past 10 days.

The Beddit Sleep Monitor belongs to a class of sleep tracking devices that aren’t wearable. It’s meant to be placed directly on the bed under the sheets rather than on the body. Design wise, it consists of a long strip of fabric that’s about 2.5 feet in length and three inches wide. One side is a soft, pliable material, while the other side, which sits on the mattress, is backed with rubber so it stays in place. It’s small enough that it’s easy to pack up when traveling.



The Sleep Monitor is meant to be placed underneath the bottom sheet of a bed, on top of the mattress near where the heart is located when you lie down. It can be placed on one side of the bed in a shared bed, or in the middle for a person who sleeps alone. While it can be used in a shared bed, Beddit is meant for one person, and because the sensor is directly underneath the body, it accurately picks up the movement of a single person even when two people are in the bed.

In my testing, the Sleep Monitor never picked up movement or measurements that weren’t mine, and it never failed to monitor me. I installed it on my side of a full-sized bed, right at the level where my heart is. Beddit says the Sleep Monitor is unnoticeable during sleep, and while it is indeed made from a thin, flexible fabric, I can feel it under my sheet. It isn’t exactly bothersome and doesn’t prevent me from sleeping, but I know it’s there.


It’s not supposed to move because of the rubber backing, but it does shift around. I don’t move much in my sleep so the movement wasn’t an issue for me, but someone who tosses and turns might need to make regular adjustments to its position. It’s also worth noting that the Beddit has a thin, unobtrusive cord that needs to be plugged in at all times, so it will need to be near an outlet.


So what does the Beddit track? As it turns out, a lot. It goes beyond wearable sleep trackers that rely solely on movement to determine sleep quality, and some of what it tracks is potentially very valuable for people with breathing-related sleep issues. Here’s everything it keeps tabs on:

  • Sleep time
  • The time it took to fall asleep
  • Light sleep vs. deep sleep (no REM measurement)
  • Number of times out of bed
  • Restless sleep (lots of tossing and turning)
  • Sleep efficiency (based on time spent asleep)
  • Sleep score (an overall score that takes everything into account)
  • Snoring (via iPhone speaker)
  • Heart rate
  • Respiration (breaths per minute)
  • Average room temperature
  • Average room humidity

With so many aspects of the sleeping experience being tracked, the Beddit Sleep Monitor gives a comprehensive overview of everything that happens while you’re asleep. Having a complete overview makes it easier to recognize patterns and problems that are interfering with sleep, especially when it’s easy to see right in the accompanying Beddit app.

So is it accurate? For the most part, yes. My heart rate measurements were in line with what I see with my Apple Watch, and the respiration measurement and temperature were spot on too. Sleep time, sleep efficiency, and the time it took to fall asleep were areas where felt like I had less of a clear picture, though.

Beddit provides an overall sleep score each night

I’m a light sleeper and it often takes me a long time to fall asleep, but at the same time, I don’t move a lot. Beddit could not tell the difference between when I was awake lying in bed and when I was actually asleep, whether it was when I was falling asleep for the first time or when I woke up in the middle of the night.

That’s led to some overestimation of the amount of time I’m asleep, which in turn impacts the sleep efficiency score. It’s not wildly inaccurate every day, but it’s been off by as much as a half hour. Someone who lies awake (and still) in bed for long swaths of time may be disappointed with the accuracy of the Beddit. A more restless sleeper won’t have this problem because the Sleep Monitor will pick up the movement.

The time to fall asleep and awake measurements here are off

Though the sleep efficiency/time measurement is not entirely accurate for me, the sleep graph in the app gives me a much clearer picture of how my night went. It measures light sleep and deep sleep, and while the app tells me I was asleep when it dips down sharply, that’s actually when I was awake. The Beddit Sleep Monitor seems to be accurately interpreting my sleep/wake patterns, but then misreading some of the data when calculating sleep efficiency and sleep score.

When I want a general idea of how I slept in a given night, I check the graph before relying on the sleep time and sleep efficiency numbers. The graph, though, is only divided by hour and so the information I have is limited – this would be a lot more useful if I could drill down into more specific timeframes. As an example, it’ll tell me I got out of bed sometime near 3:00 a.m., but it won’t give me the exact time.

Beddit says I slept roughly the same amount of time on these two nights, but the graph tells a different story. At each dip, I was awake, not in a state of light sleep.

Along with the light/deep sleep graph, the Beddit app offers up concrete numbers on all of the different tracking metrics, plus a graph for heart rate. Comparing the sleep graph and the heart rate graph has proven to be interesting because of the correlation between the two. There are often small jumps in my heart rate at the times when Beddit says I’m most deeply asleep, which seems to relate to dreams/nightmares.

A sleep graph compared to a heart rate graph from the same night

The Beddit app measures two factors I wasn’t able to properly test — snoring and restless sleep. I don’t seem to move enough to trigger any restless sleep readings, and I don’t snore. My partner snores, though, so I can say that it’s sensitive enough to tell my breathing from his. By the way, the Beddit has been able to track my sleeping accurately regardless of position. I’m a side or stomach sleeper, but also tested sleeping on my back. There’s no difference in the data.

Beddit data is displayed on a day-by-day basis, but there are also options to see trends over 7, 30, and 90 days. Trends cover sleep score, sleep time, heart rate, bedroom temperature/humidity, and a notes feature, which is actually one of the handiest ways to measure sleep trends.


Each morning, you can rate how you feel after a night’s sleep and add notes and tags to keep track of factors that might have impacted sleep. My cat meows some mornings, so I might add a note that I was woken up by the cat. If I ate something unusual or drank caffeine late in the day, those are also things that could be noted, and over time, I might be able to notice trends. Tags are important because the app will automatically correlate tags with sleep efficiency scores.

My sleep is worse on nights tagged “cat,” which means my cat was meowing in the early morning.

There’s a built-in smart alarm feature in the Beddit app, designed to go off up to 30 minutes before the set time whenever sleep is lightest. The idea is that if you’re woken up in a light sleep, you’ll be less groggy. It worked semi-well, but 30 minutes is a long window and there’s no customization option to shorten it.


One other thing worth noting — Beddit can be set to automatically start tracking sleep as soon as you get in the bed at night, so there’s no need to open the app and turn it on. I liked the convenience of this feature, but ended up leaving manual activation on because I like to read in bed before sleeping and the Beddit thought I was asleep when I was reading.

Overall, the Beddit app is well done and it offers up a lot of info, but there are some negatives. First of all, the Beddit Sleep Monitor needs to be continually connected to the iPhone via Bluetooth when it’s in use at night, which Beddit says is necessary because of the amount of data being transferred. With a continual Bluetooth connection, the Beddit is a serious battery drain (it’ll suck up a good 30 to 40% on an iPhone 7 Plus). You’re going to want to plug your iPhone in at night when using it.

Second, snoring tracking is done on the iPhone, and there’s no way to disable it. That means Beddit is using the microphone, which happens to disable my AirPods and other Bluetooth headphones. It also prevents “Hey Siri” hands-free commands from working. There is no option to disable snoring tracking, which is a downside for people who don’t snore.

Third, given the amount of information the Sleep Monitor tracks, I think the app could offer up more detail, like a clearer picture of specific heart rate and respiration rates over time. Luckily, it connects to Apple Health, and all of this data is synced there.

In the Health app, you can see each respiration and heart rate measurement during the night, and the Beddit also syncs overall sleep data.

Heart rate measurement in Health app on left, respiration on right

One last thing — the Beddit is compatible with nap taking. It tracks nap length just like a standard night of sleep and adds that information to the day’s overall sleep score and sleep time.

Bottom Line

In 10 days, the Beddit Sleep Monitor hasn’t taught me anything I didn’t already know, but as someone who likes to track things and collect data, I find the information it’s giving me valuable, even if some of its conclusions about my sleep aren’t 100 percent accurate. I suspect that with longer use and more attention to tags, I might be able to learn more.

I’ve had sleep problems my entire life, so I’ve already learned to stick to a rigorous sleep routine, but someone who needs help establishing good sleep habits or figuring out what’s impacting sleep could potentially benefit from the Beddit Sleep Monitor.

With its snoring, heart rate, and respiration features, Beddit will be able to pick up on sleep apnea and breathing issues, and the data combined with user notes can help suss out other sleep problems.

$150 is expensive, but if it’s able to provide a better night’s sleep for someone who’s struggling, the high price tag is worth it. People without serious sleep issues who just like to keep track of health metrics will also likely be satisfied with the Beddit given the many things it tracks.

In its current incarnation, the Beddit Sleep Monitor is a decent sleep tracker. With Apple’s tweaking, I think it could be a lot better. In my experience, it’s collecting all the data it needs, but with some fine tuning, that data could be better interpreted and more valuable.

I’ve never used a sleep tracker that can tell the difference between when I’m lying in bed and when I’m asleep, but if anyone can solve that problem and refine sleep tracking algorithms, it’ll probably be Apple. I’m interested to see what kind of improvements Apple can make to sleep tracking and what it plans to do with the data and the technology it has acquired from Beddit, so I’ll keep using my Sleep Monitor.

How to Buy

The Beddit 3 Sleep Monitor can be purchased from Apple for $149.95.

Tag: Beddit

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Acquisitions accelerate as tech giants seek to build AI smarts

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – A total of 34 artificial intelligence startups were acquired in the first quarter of this year, more than twice the amount of activity in the year-ago quarter, according to the research firm CB Insights.

Apple may aid investigation into deadly 2016 EgyptAir crash

Apple on Friday said that it’s open to cooperation with French authorities…

The Facebook president and Zuck’s racist rulebook

If a political campaign is an engine then propaganda is its oil, and its gas is the medium of communication with voters.

The hacking of the DNC and tonnes of raw crude in propaganda mined out through WikiLeaks, Breitbart and Daily Stormer was…

Securely record and view ‘home videos’ with your partner with Rumuki app for iPhone

If you’re looking for an ephemeral video sharing app, limiting the recipients to two people who must both consent to viewing the recorded video, iOS-exclusive app Rumuki fits the bill.

This robot arm’s AI thinks like we do about how to grab something

 Robots are great at doing things they’ve been shown how to do, but when presented with a novel problem, such as an unfamiliar shape that needs to be gripped, they tend to choke. AI is helping there in the form of systems like Dex-Net, which uses deep learning to let a robotic arm improvise an effective grip for objects it’s never seen before. Read More

Marissa Mayer will pocket $186 million when Verizon fully acquires Yahoo next month

Marissa Mayer will pocket $186 million when Verizon fully acquires Yahoo next month…

The Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool has been updated for WannaCry

Microsoft offers a number of free anti-malware tools. Windows 10 and 8.1 users have Windows Defender. Windows 7 users can chose between the full-featured Microsoft Security Essentials (MSE) or the limited Windows Defender. But all Windows users have…

TouchArcade iOS Gaming Roundup: Steredenn, Fidget Spinner Apps, Prison Architect, and More

In case you missed the post last week, once again this is Eli Hodapp, and I’m Editor in Chief of MacRumors‘ iOS gaming sister site TouchArcade. We’re putting together these weekly roundups of the biggest news and releases in the world of iOS gaming. If you’re interested in this quick recap, there’s tons more where this came from over on TouchArcade. We post daily news, reviews, and more, covering every aspect of the world of iOS gaming.


We’ve also got a very active iOS gaming Twitch channel, a Discord server, our own forums, and a weekly podcast. All of these things are packed with other iOS gamers and developers, discussing iOS gaming around the clock! Anyway, here are the big things you don’t want to miss this week:

We kicked off Monday morning with a five star review of Steredenn. It’s an incredible horizontal space shooter that aside from just being a really fun game does a lot of incredibly innovative things when it comes to how weapon upgrades are handled, as well as how you move your ship. For instance, these games often use a relative-touch based control scheme, and that’s true here, but when the game detects your ship is obscured by your finger both a horizontal and vertical line appear on screen indicating where you are. It sounds basic, and I suppose it is, but the difference these little things make is amazing.

While I’m a little surprised that the collective internet eye-roll surrounding the Angry Birds movie didn’t cause some sort of seismic event when it was first announced, the film did incredibly well, grossing just under $350 million. (It’s actually far better than you’d expect, if you haven’t seen it.) So, it should be a surprise to absolutely no one that a sequel is on the way.

Due out on September 20th, 2019, The Angry Birds Movie 2 already has some interesting names signed on. It’ll be directed by Thurop Van Orman and John Rice (with the latter serving as co-director), who have worked on Adventure Time and Rick and Morty. No further details surrounding the plot or direction of the film have been made public, although there’s plenty of time for all sorts of tidbits to dribble out before late 2019.

We’ve spent a lot of time discussing the troubling trend of what a bad platform iOS when it comes to preserving gaming history, as iOS system updates (and other things) often render classic iOS titles totally broken. With iOS 11 likely dropping support for 32-bit apps and games, we’re on the verge of seeing the largest purge of older iOS games yet. While Apple’s response is to simply update those games to 64-bit binaries, we explore in an editorial, “just updating” is often not as simple as it sounds – particularly if the creator of a game you love is deceased.

Lightening things up a bit, we’ve been scratching our heads trying to figure out the unbelievable popularity of fidget spinner apps. It seems the whole draw of a fidget spinner is it’s a physical toy that exists, which you actively fidget with. You’d think virtualizing this would remove most of the appeal, but judging by the iTunes charts, that isn’t the case at all. After talking to various educators, we offer an alternative theory. Perhaps fidget spinner apps are becoming the next big thing because fidget spinners themselves are rapidly getting banned from classrooms, while smartphones, inexplicably, are totally allowed? Either way, if you’re interested in trying the most popular one, download Ketchapp’s Fidget Spinner.

Limbic released the original Zombie Gunship on the App Store ages ago, and the unbelievable success of a game where you shoot down swarms of zombies aboard an AC-130 put the studio on the map. Another Zombie Gunship game has been in development forever, in soft launch for even longer, and finally launched worldwide this week. While it shares a lot with its predecessor, Zombie Gunship Survival has much more meat on its bones with loads of things to unlock and other upgrades to work towards. The original Zombie Gunship was a ton of fun, so more of that, plus loads of improvements makes Survival even better.

The rivalry between the FIFA and Pro Evolution Soccer series on mobile has been heating up for years now, but with FIFA taking an odd turn to becoming more of a card collecting game, this week’s release of Pro Evolution Soccer 2017 is perfect for soccer fans looking for more action. Early impressions of the game indicate that it finally feels like iOS has the soccer simulator that it deserves with a full-featured soccer experience that is just absolutely loaded with depth. Controls are swipe based, which people seem to either love or hate, but it’s totally free to try out so if you’re at all interested in soccer, this is the game to get.

After a lengthy soft launch period, the cult-classic fighting game Skullgirls is finally available. Like many other mobile fighters, it is controlled using swipe gestures which has proven to work incredibly well for the genre. The mechanics of the game are super tight, and once you get used to the swiping system, you likely won’t find yourself missing a controller at all. Like many free to play fighters, Skullgirls is powered by a freemium random draw gacha system to unlock new characters, which again, has become totally normal for the genre (for better or for worse).

Prison Architect has been incredibly popular on Steam, and this week the mobile port hit the App Store. It’s iPad only, like many PC to mobile ports, and puts players in charge of designing and managing their own prisons. Featuring surprising levels of complexity, Prison Architect has an array of scenarios to complete which really serve as a tutorial of sorts for the full-featured sandbox mode. One strange thing is how you pay for the game: It’s free to download and try, then you can buy individual scenarios for $2.99 a piece, the sandbox mode for $4.99, or unlock everything for $14.99. It feels like they give too much away for free, but for the curious consumer I suppose that’s a good thing.


In the past, Capcom has released Street Fighter games on mobile, with the first one hitting the App Store all the way back in 2010. Aside from compatibility updates here and there, the games have largely sat dormant and over the years have only felt increasingly more outdated. This week, in true Capcom fashion, the iterative sequel Street Fighter IV Championship Edition was announced. Aside from 25 playable characters, Championship Edition will have full MFi controller support, WiFi multiplayer, and loads of other updates and refinements over the original Street Fighter mobile games. Championship Edition will be released “this summer,” and you can pre-register for the game here to get notified when it does.

Last, but not least, with the holiday weekend upon us, an absurd amount of iOS games are on sale. The whole Infinity Blade series can be had for a buck a piece, along with many, many other classic, premium iOS games. Head over to our listing to see everything worth considering downloading, along with reviews of the vast majority of games that are on sale.

That’s it for this week! For even more iOS gaming news, head over to TouchArcade – otherwise stay tuned for next week’s roundup!

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Why Apple’s App Store is good business for your enterprise

At least 69 iOS developers managed to make their first million-dollars in app revenue last year

Chipotle says hackers hit most restaurants in data breach

(Reuters) – Hackers used malware to steal customer payment data from most of Chipotle Mexican Grill Inc’s restaurants over a span of three weeks, the company said on Friday, adding to woes at the chain whose sales had just started recovering from a st…

Friday 5: Screens 4 brings new features to the Mac [Video]

Although there are many solutions available to remotely connect to a Mac, Screens has long been my go to app for doing so. Edovia’s long-running app, available on both Mac and iOS, makes it extremely simple to connect back to your Mac, and forgoes the subscription business model for a one time payment model.

Screens 4, which just released for the Mac earlier this week, brings a bevy of new features to the table in an effort to make the app even easier to use. In this week’s Friday 5, we highlight a few of the new features that we especially appreciate. more…

Uber is free to operate in Italy on a long-term basis

If you’re in Italy, you can use Uber. A court in Rome today annulled a temporary ban placed on Uber in early April that prevented the company from advertising and operating throughout the country. This didn’t completely stop Uber from infiltrating It…

MacRumors Giveaway: Win a Copy of ‘Total War: WARHAMMER’ From Feral Interactive

For this week’s giveaway, we’ve teamed up with Feral Interactive to give MacRumors readers a chance to win a copy of real-time strategy game Total War: WARHAMMER, which became available for the Mac in April.

Total War: WARHAMMER is a turn-based strategy game that allows players to build an empire and then plan and execute real-time tactical battles against enemies. Unlike other Warhammer games, Total War: WARHAMMER takes place in a high fantasy setting, pitting greenskins (orcs and goblins), vampires, dwarves, and humans against one another.


There are four playable factions that players can control, each with unique gameplay elements, play styles, abilities, and units to send into battle. The goal is to build up a city, recruit units, make alliances with other nations, and fight to protect and expand your hold over the Old World.


Aerial units like wyverns and dragons, specially trained Legendary Lords, and other powerful elements like magic must be thoughtfully wielded to turn the tide in battle. Because there are multiple factions and game paths to take, Total War: WARHAMMER is endlessly replayable.

Mac vs. Mac online multiplayer is available and supports up to eight players. There’s also a co-op mode that allows players to play through the campaign with or against a friend.


Feral Interactive, for those unfamiliar with the company, is a video game publisher that works with various companies to bring popular PC games to the Mac. Feral has brought a wide range of titles to the Mac, like the LEGO series, Rome: Total War, Tomb Raider, XCOM, and several Warhammer titles.

Total War: WARHAMMER is available from Steam, the Feral Interactive website, or the Mac App Store for $49.99-$59.99, but we have 10 Steam copies to give away to MacRumors readers.

To enter to win, use the Rafflecopter widget below and enter an email address. Email addresses will be used solely for contact purposes to reach the winner and send the prize. You can earn additional entries by subscribing to our weekly newsletter, subscribing to our YouTube channel, following us on Twitter, or visiting the MacRumors Facebook page.

Due to the complexities of international laws regarding giveaways, only U.S. residents who are 18 years of age or older are eligible to enter. To offer feedback or get more information on the giveaway restrictions, please refer to our Site Feedback section, as that is where discussion of the rules will be redirected.

a Rafflecopter giveawayThe contest will run from today (May 26) at 11:00 a.m. Pacific Time through 11:00 a.m. Pacific Time on June 2. The winners will be chosen randomly on June 2 and will be contacted by email. The winners will have 48 hours to respond and provide a shipping address before new winners are chosen.

Tags: giveaway, Feral

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Apple may aid investigation into deadly 2016 EgyptAir crash

Apple on Friday said that it’s open to cooperation with French authorities, who are exploring the possibility that two of the company’s devices were linked to the crash of EgyptAir Flight 804 in 2016.

9to5Rewards: Sphero’s Star Wars BB-8 iPhone-controlled droid [Giveaway]

This week’s 9to5Rewards partner is Wellbots, a US-based online retailer that specializes in smart products like drones, robots, wearables, home automation devices, connected toys and more.

The company has the iPhone-controlled Sphero BB-8 Star Wars Droid to give away to 9to5Mac readers this week. 

more…

Massively speed-up your Mac’s public VPN

Recently I underwent a revelatory experience when using the public VPN service…

Roborace autonomous car takes a lap in Paris

Roborace test in Paris At the Formula E Paris ePrix over the weekend, the driverless Roborace navigated a lap of the 1.9 km course all by itself — all 14 turns. The autonomous car uses 5 lidar sensors, 2 radar sensors, 18 ultrasonic sensors, 2 optical speed sensors, 6 AI cameras, and satellite positioning information to know where it is and navigate its route. All this data is processed by Nvidia’s… Read More

KidPass raises $5.1 million for its children’s activity subscription service

 KidPass, a monthly membership program that gives parents access to a variety of kid-friendly activities across their city, has raised $5.1 million in Series A funding, the startup reported this week. Currently live in New York, the new funds will…

On-demand food startup Sprig is shutting down today

 Sprig, the startup that makes and delivers its own food, is shutting down today, The Information reports. TechCrunch has since obtained the copy of the email Sprig is sending to customers today.
“It is with a heavy heart that my co-founders and I share that Sprig, Inc. will be shutting down the app today,” Sprig CEO Gagan Biyani wrote in an email customers will receive… Read More

How to fix a Mac that won’t turn on

While Macs are well-built and for the most part reliable, they are computers…

UK wants G7 to take collective action on online extremism

 The UK Prime Minister is using the annual G7 summit of seven of the world’s major industrialized democracies to push for more to be done about online extremism, including co-ordinating on ways to force social media platforms to be more pro-active about removing and reporting extremist content to authorities. Read More

9to5Toys Lunch Break: Apple Watch Series 2 $70 off, iPad mini 4 $300, Mophie Juice Pack for iPhone 7/Plus $50, more

Keep up with the best gear and deals on the web by signing up for the 9to5Toys Newsletter. Also, be sure to check us out on: TwitterRSS FeedFacebookGoogle+ and Safari push notifications.

TODAY’S CAN’T MISS DEALS:

Best Buy Memorial Day Sale: $70 off Apple Watch Series 2, iPad mini 4 $300, more!

Mophie Juice Pack Battery for iPhone 7/Plus for $50 shipped (Reg. $99)

Apple’s Great Games for $1 Sale: BADLAND, Assassin’s Creed, many more

Apple’s 9.7-inch iPad Pro gets $124 discount, priced from $475

Best Buy is clearing out official Apple Watch Sport Bands, starting at $34 (or less)

Apple 13-inch MacBook Air 256GB gets a $279 discount to $920 shipped

Assassin’s Creed Identity for iOS drops to just $1 (Reg. $5)

 

9to5Rewards: Twelve South Action Sleeve for Apple Watch [Giveaway]

MORE NEW GEAR FROM TODAY:

Smartphone Accessories: 2-Pack Anker Screen Protectors for iPhone 7/Plus $4, more

NEW PRODUCTS & MORE:

DEWALT overhauls Bluetooth Connect system w/ new tools, trackers, more

Gogoro’s second gen electric scooter has a lower price, same power

Pokemon’s Magikarp Jump splashes onto iOS and Android for worldwide release

MORE DEALS STILL LIVE:

iHome SmartPlug with HomeKit/Alexa hits Amazon all-time low: $42 shipped

Apple’s official Silicone iPhone 7 cases are on sale at Amazon from $24

Pad & Quill offering 20% off leather/linen iPad & Apple Watch accessories

more…

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